Description

From arid coastal plains to chilly cloud forests, Hawai‘i is home to an astonishing range of flora. Many of our plant species, like the regal koa and hardy silversword, can be found nowhere else in the world!

Knowing how to identify these plants, and learning about their historical uses and associated legends will greatly enrich your hiking experience. In A Hiker’s Guide to Trailside Plants, John B. Hall introduces you many of the plants—both native and nonnative—that you are likely to encounter on Hawai‘i’s trails.

For easy reference, plants in this handy book have been divided into the following climatic zones: Coastal, Dry Forest, Mesic Forest, Wet Forest, and Alpine. Each color-coded zone is further subdivided into Herbs, Shrubs, Trees, Vines, Ferns, and Miscellaneous. Along the way, author John B. Hall points out notable features— leaf shape, flower color, and even taste—that will help you to identify each plant.

Table of Contents

Coastal Plants

Herbs

Akulikuli

Alena

Australian Saltbush

Hinahina

Ilima

Nehe

Pickleweed

Portulaca, Ihi

Pua Kala

Shurbs

Indian Fleabane, Indian Pluchea

Mao

Noni

Pohinahina, Beach Vitex

Trees

Hala

Hau

Milo

Naio, Bastard Sandalwood

Tree Heliotrope

Vines

Beach Morning Glory, Pohuehue

Kaunaoa, Dodder

Pau O Hiiaka

Sea Bean

Dry Forest Plants

Herbs

Ageratina, Maui Pamakani

Ageratum

Air Plant

Amaranth

Carrion Flower

Coat Buttons

Common Basil, Sweet Basil

Coral Berry

Desmodium, Spanish Clover

Enaena

Flora’s Paintbrush

Hairy Horseweed

Iliee, Plumbago

Kookoolau

Lion’s Ear

Molasses Grass

Partridge Pea

Popolo, Black Nightshade

Sensitive Plant, Sleeping Grass

Spurflower, Plectranthus, Alaala Wai Nui Pua Ki

Uhaloa

Verbena

Shurbs

Aalii

Abutilon

Aheahea

Akia

Akoko

Burr Bush

Castor Bean

Indigo